Monday, 24 October 2016

High Blood Pressure Food

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Food Of High Blood Pressure: 

High blood pressure and diet
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Making changes to your diet is a proven way to help control high blood pressure. These changes can also help you lose weight and lower your chance of heart disease and stroke.

Your health care provider can refer you to a dietitian who can help you create a healthy meal plan. Ask what your blood pressure target is. Your target will be based on your risk factors and other medical problems.

HEART HEALTHY DIET

Eat foods that are naturally low in fat. These include whole grains, fruits, and vegetables.

Read food labels. Pay special attention to the level of saturated fat.
Avoid or limit foods that are high in saturated fat (more than 20% of the total fat is considered high). Eating too much saturated fat is one of the major risk factors for heart disease. Food high in this type of fat include: egg yolks, hard cheeses, whole milk, cream, ice cream, butter, and fatty meats (and large portions of meats).
Choose lean protein foods. These include soy, fish, skinless chicken, very lean meat, and fat-free or 1% fat dairy products.
Look for the words "hydrogenated" or "partially hydrogenated" on food labels. DO NOT eat foods with these ingredients. They are very high in saturated fats and trans fats.
Limit how much fried and processed foods you eat.
Limit how many commercially prepared baked goods (such as doughnuts, cookies, and crackers) you eat. They may contain a lot of saturated fats or trans fats.
Pay attention to how foods are prepared. Healthy ways to cook fish, chicken, and lean meats are broiling, grilling, poaching, and baking. Avoid adding high-fat dressings or sauces.
Other tips include:

Eat foods that are high in soluble fiber. These include oats, bran, split peas and lentils, beans (such as kidney, black, and navy beans), some cereals, and brown rice.
Learn how to shop for and cook foods that are healthy for your heart. Learn how to read food labels to choose healthy foods. Stay away from fast food restaurants, where healthy choices can be hard to find.
DASH DIET

The low-salt Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet is proven to help lower blood pressure. Its effects on blood pressure are sometimes seen within a few weeks.

This diet is rich in important nutrients and fiber. It also includes foods that are higher in potassium, calcium, and magnesium lower in sodium (salt) than the typical American diet.

DASH diet
The goals of the DASH diet are:

Limit sodium to no more than 2,300 mg a day (eating only 1,500 mg a day is an even better goal).
Reduce saturated fat to no more than 6% of daily calories and total fat to 27% of daily calories. Low-fat dairy products appear to be especially beneficial for lowering systolic blood pressure.
When choosing fats, select monounsaturated oils, such as olive or canola oil.
Choose whole grains over white flour or pasta products.
Choose fresh fruits and vegetables every day. Many of these foods are rich in potassium, fiber, or both.
Eat nuts, seeds, or legumes (beans or peas) daily.
Choose modest amounts of protein (no more than 18% of total daily calories). Fish, skinless poultry, and soy products are the best protein sources.
Other daily nutrient goals in the DASH diet include limiting carbohydrates to 55% of daily calories and dietary cholesterol to 150 mg. Try to get at least 30 grams (g) of daily fiber.


Check with your provider before you increase the potassium in your diet or use salt substitutes (which often contain potassium). People who have kidney problems or who take certain medicines must be careful about how much potassium they consume.

Diet Of High Blood Pressure

In this article write a full information of high blood pressure. full details of high blood pressure causes,symptoms,what is high blood pressure ,definition of high blood pressure symptoms of high blood pressure. We also write treatment of high blood pressure like as medicine of high blood pressure,treatment of high blood pressure in home.Sign of high blood pressure,symptoms of high blood pressure dizziness. And also write how to reduce high blood pressure in a limit time period and diet of high blood pressure


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High Blood Pressure diet:

One of the quickest ways to lower your blood pressure (especially if you have high blood pressure) is to eat less salt.

Salt raises your blood pressure. The more salt you eat, the higher your blood pressure will be.

Salt makes your body retain water. If you eat too much, the extra water stored in your body raises your blood pressure. This can be a particular problem if you have high blood pressure. Also, eating too much salt may mean that blood pressure medicines, such as diuretics, don't work as well.


How much salt is too much?
An adult should eat no more than 6g of salt a day, but most of us eat much more than this.

Most of the salt we eat every day is "hidden". Roughly 80% of the salt we eat is hiding in processed foods like bread, biscuits and breakfast cereals, and prepared ready meals or takeaways. Only 20% comes from the salt we add while cooking or at the table.


What salt levels mean
To avoid the hidden salt and cut down your salt intake, it is best to eat foods that are low in salt and stop using salt when cooking or at the table.

By reading the food label, you can see if a food is low, medium or high in salt (do not confuse with sodium, see below):

Low - 0.3g salt or less per 100g of food - Eat plenty of these
Medium - 0.3-1.5g salt per 100g of food - Eat small amounts occasionally
High - 1.5g salt  or more per 100g of food - Avoid these completely

What sodium levels mean
Some labels may not say how much salt the food contains, but may say how much sodium it contains. Sodium is one of the chemicals in salt. 1g of sodium is the same as 2.5g of salt.

Low - 0.1g sodium or less per 100g of food - Eat plenty of these
Medium - 0.1-0.6g sodium per 100g of food - Eat small amounts occasionally
High - 0.6 sodium or more per 100g of food - Avoid if possible
If the label does not say how much salt or sodium the food contains, look at the ingredients list. The closer to the top of the list salt appears, the more salt it is likely to contain.


8 ways to eat less salt and help your blood pressure
Don’t add salt when cooking. This includes things like soy sauce, curry powders and stock cubes.
Get extra flavour with herbs and spices, and from seasonings like chilli, ginger, lemon or lime juice.
If you really can't do without a salty favour, you could try using a small amount of low-sodium salt substitute. If you have kidney problems or diabetes, check with your doctor or nurse first.
Table sauces like ketchup, mustard and pickles can contain a lot of salt. Check the label and choose low-salt options.
Bread and breakfast cereals can contain a lot of salt. Check the labels to compare brands.
Smoked meats and fish contain a lot of salt. Avoid these if you can.
If you are eating out, ask if your meal can be made with less salt. This may not be possible, but it is always worth asking.
Look out for low-salt recipes. There are a number of low-salt cookbooks available, or you can search on the Internet.
Don’t be too concerned about the exact amount of salt you eat, instead try to always eat  foods with the lowest salt level. 6g of salt a day is the maximum you should eat, and the less you eat the better.


At first, food without salt can taste bland, but don’t give up. After a few weeks your taste buds will adjust and you will start to enjoy food with less salt.